How A Real Life Crime Inspired A New DUI Law In Maryland

While working on a DUI special task force in Montgomery County, Maryland, 24-year-old Noah Leotta was in the process of stopping another vehicle for suspicion of DUI on December 3, 2015. When he was returning to his police car, he was struck and ultimately killed by Luis Gustavo Reluzco. Prior to the accident, Reluzco was drinking and using Marijuana.

In response to this tragic accident, Maryland passed a new act entitled Drunk Driving Reduction Act of 2015 also known as Noah’s Law. The act was signed by Governor Larry Hogan on May 19th, 2016 and was put into effect on October of that year.

The law requires an ignition interlock system to be installed on cars operated by anyone who was convicted of a DUI, a DWI while transporting a minor or anyone who was convicted of vehicular manslaughter while driving under the influence or while intoxicated. The law also determines the length in which drivers licensed should be suspended if a blood alcohol test is refused or if the result is over .15.

Maryland is known for its very strict legislation regarding those who are pulled over on suspicion of drunk driving. First-time offenders face up to a year in prison and a $1000 fine. Their look back period is also 5 years which can make multiple DUI charges add up quicker than other states.